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Questions to ponder for 2014: Can we resolve to be just a little bit better?

Incremental changes sustained over time can lead to monumental improvements. - The Kaizen Way

The problem with most goal-setting isn't that the ideas aren't ambitious enough, it's that we fail to acknowledge the steps towards improvement we've already taken. While sweeping and radical changes may capture the imagination, they tend to falter in the execution. And we lose our desire to stay the course when changes diverge too radically from our daily habits.

This year, let's resolve to sustain progress in a positive direction. Ask yourself the following and answer in the affirmative and I know you'll summon the courage to commit. These reflect some of what I'm committing myself to, and I hope I can enlist you likewise.

1. Personal: can I resolve to show more gratitude towards my colleagues by making sure that I make it a point to say "thank you" meaningfully once more daily?

2. Professional: can I resolve to communicate positively in a way that shows my awareness I am always an ambassador for my school, my district, and my profession?

3. Healthful: can I resolve to make one small positive change in my fitness regimen or nutrition routines that is something I'm confident I can do daily?

4. Analytical: can I find a way to use a new data set that illustrates something significant about student performance in a way I can convey vividly to others?

5. Adaptive: can I model for others how to respond to life's inevitable changes by embracing the unexpected where my first response is "Yes I can!" instead of "What now?"

Happy 2014! May all your best wishes for the new year find fulfillment through your efforts.
From http://visual.ly/top-10-new-years-resolutions?utm_campaign=website&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email

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